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Smallbone kitchen repaint Wakefield

Listed under Blog, hand-painted kitchen, Lee Simone Posted Dec 11 2015

Traditional Painter Lee Simone was entrusted with a Smallbone kitchen repaint near Wakefield. This is an interesting story, a surprisingly major transformation!

The finished repaint

The finished repaint

For this Smallbone kitchen repaint I headed over to Hartshead near Wakefield.

The clients contacted me initially by phone to see if I might be interested in undertaking the work. I said I would be more than happy to, and asked them to send me over some photos so I could give them an initial estimate by email.

They contacted me a few days later saying they were comfortable with my estimate and asked to arrange a consultation with them. Happy to, I said 🙂

As it turned out, they had actually done a lot of research and had been searching for some time for the right person to undertake the work. Being a Smallbone kitchen, it would have been expensive and they wanted it repainted by someone they could trust to achieve the top class finish their kitchen deserved.

The original finish

The original finish

From the photos, I had a good idea about the quality of the current finish, but seeing it in person actually stunned me! Rarely have I seen a poorer finish.

The primer had not been sanded back and there were bumps and lumps everywhere. The painting itself had brush marks, drips and bits in it. The hinges were covered in paint and much of it hadn’t been masked off, so there was paint on the insides and on the granite. Many areas also hadn’t been filled properly and the specialist paint effect was uneven and poorly applied too. All in all not good, but it wasn’t anything that couldn’t be rectified.

The finished repaint

The finished repaint

After explaining in detail what I would do, and the finish I could achieve, they said they would be more than happy to entrust the project to me. My lead time wasn’t an issue either, so, great news, but my word, I would have my work cut out. I could see that this kitchen project would be a labour of love, and the end results would speak for themselves, but only after massive amounts of preparation!

During the consultation we also looked at colours and after a goodly amount of consideration the colour decided upon was London Stone – which I could match accurately in my specialist kitchen paints of choice.

Just as a side note – the light in the room was very changeable and differed from section to section, so although everything was painted in ‘London Stone’, the colours look different from photo to photo.

Close up of the new paint finish

Close up of the new paint finish

The project itself

Not a bad working view!

Not a bad working view!

When it was time for me to head back over to Hartshead and give this lovely Smallbone kitchen the finish it deserved, it was a lovely sunny day. When I arrived, I was greeted with this view as I began getting my kit out and setting up – lovely!

Getting ready for sanding

I follow a well proven process, and after thoroughly cleaning and degreasing everything, I masked off the floor, worktops, appliances, edges etc and was then ready to begin the sanding…

Using my dust free electric sanding system and Mirka and Festool sanding pads, I systematically worked my way round the kitchen removing any bump, lump, bit and drip. Any brush marks were also sanded right back until the base I had was as smooth as the proverbial. I then set about cleaning the paint off the hinges using a combination of white spirit, meths and fine grade wire wool pads.

All set up and ready to sand!

All set up and ready to sand!

When it comes to this kind of ‘put it right’ project you know you are in for some serious graft where patience and attention to detail are going to be paramount throughout.

It would be easy to just say ‘oh that’ll do‘ after 5 days of prep, but that’s not the way I work.

If a job’s worth doing it’s worth doing really well 🙂

The original finish

The original finish

After many hours it was at last time for some painty primer action!

My finish

My finish

The original finish

The original finish

My finish

My finish

The Painting –

Though the kitchen had already been painted, my next stage was to apply a coat of specialist high adhesion primer. This priming stage is pivotal as it would not only ensure high durability but also act as the perfect basecoat for my top coats.

After priming I lightly sanded everything back, checking again and again for bumps and lumps until I had a perfectly smooth base. I then moved on to the filling and caulking stage, sorting out any areas that needed attention. After the filling I sanded the areas back and was ready for top coating.

I applied two or three layers of Empire oil eggshell for my top coats, using a combination of mini rollers and brushes. The process I use ensures that there are no visible brush marks and no orange peel effect, only a lovely smooth and even finish.

NB: ‘Orange peel’ is a term used for the bobbly effect you get from using a roller, if you don’t smooth out the paint afterwards.

The finished finish so to speak :-)

The finished finish so to speak 🙂

Smile!

Smile!

Not a bump, lump of brush stroke in sight

Not a bump, lump of brush stroke in sight

Natural timber rescue

Orange oak repair

Orange oak repair

Another part of this project was to change the colour of the wooden areas in the kitchen, which included this very large free standing cabinet, the mantel above the range, the wine rack and the frame of their chalk board.

Over the years the oak had taken on a decidedly orangey hue which wasn’t that nice at all. The client really wanted this changed, so I set about making it a warmer, more reddy/brown.

After the usual preparation – cleaning and sanding – I started experimenting with colours. The end result was achieved my mixing 2 colours of Osmo Polyx Hardwax Oil, ‘Light Oak’ and ‘Walnut’. I then sealed everything with 2 coats of Transparent Polyx Oil with a light satin sheen.

The new richer reddy brown finish

The new richer reddy brown finish

As you can see from this picture the colour was a lot richer and more pleasing to the eye. One advantage of hand-tinting the oils is that the end result was also a super match for the new paint finish.

Repaint complete!

Repaint complete!

And there you have it, job done! With so much prep work completed on this project the end result was truly very rewarding. The clients were really really happy with the finish and with the way I had worked. They have since been back in touch and booked me in to repaint some of their bedroom furniture. I’m looking forward to that transformation and seeing that view again already 🙂

If you would like to see more of my hand painted kitchen projects or other specialist painting works please visit my website –

www.imaginativeinteriors.co.uk

Thanks for reading, until next time…

We refurbish and repaint older kitchens – small, medium and large across the whole price, style, brand and exclusivity range – and apply the exact same care and attention to detail. You can find several examples of larger bespoke kitchens that we have repainted, (including this reclaimed kitchen) and fitted furniture.



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